The Inheritance – Now available!

  If you inherit something, do you also inherit responsibility for its history? Even if you have no awareness of that history? So begins my second novel, The Inheritance, available on Amazon and iBooks. This novel fictionalizes my own internal struggle and eventual resolution of discovering that money I had inherited could be traced to land […]

Genealogy and Anti-Racism: A Resource for White People 

I want to connect my love of genealogy with the work of anti-racism. As a child and teenager, I loved genealogy. With handwritten charts and typed biographies, I had no question about the goodness of what I was doing. I was honoring and preserving the past. What could be better? Eventually, I went off to […]

Critical Family History Book Review: Before we were Yours

Adoption presents challenges to family historians. Perhaps the greatest challenge is figuring out how important it is to trace biological ancestors, especially if they have had little or no role in actually raising a person. Lisa Wingate, in Before we were Yours (Ballantine, 2017), grapples with this question, although her purpose is mainly to critique […]

Confronting Racism at Home

As a white teacher educator who has taken on the “daunting” (Sleeter, 2008) work of antiracist education with preservice teachers, the work of critical family history is beginning to play a key role in my classroom. Importantly, critical family history is giving me insights into my family’s complicity in the fight against multiculturalism, as it […]

Returning What was Stolen

On September 24, 2017, I returned to the Ute Nation money I had inherited derived from the sale of a homestead on the Utes’ homeland in the Yampa Valley of Colorado immediately after the Utes had been expelled. How did I trace my inheritance to the Utes’ loss of land? Why did I frame the […]

Book Review: The Lost

The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million tells the story of how Daniel Mendelsohn searched for all he could learn about one family that perished during the Holocaust. What particularly intrigued me about this prize-winning book was the author’s decision to cast it mainly as a memoir about the process of searching for a […]

Preventing Home-Grown White Terrorism

A few days ago, white supremacist Jeremy Joseph Christian stabbed three men — Ricky Best, Taliesin Namkai-Meche and Micah Fletcher — on a train in Portland, Oregon because they were defending two young women, one of whom wore a hijab, from Christian’s racist rant. Two of the men died immediately, victims of home-grown white terror. Christian, who […]

Multicultural Programming in one State

A couple of years ago, I was asked to serve as an expert witness in the court case Martinez v. New Mexico. The case itself is quite extensive and complicated. My portion of the work focused on multicultural programming. Specifically, I analyzed 1) empirical research on practices and impacts of multicultural education on students, 2) New […]

The First Step Towards Healing

Have you ever felt disenfranchised, bullied or marginalized? How about the feeling of simply not fitting in within your environment? For some, this describes their adolescent years. For too many others this experience repeats itself throughout life. Many experience such to the extent of feeling like outsiders daily. The first step towards healing is admitting […]

Critical Family History Book Review: Homegoing

What might a family history look and feel like that, while not based strictly on genealogy, portrays in exquisite detail who one’s ancestors could have been? This is the project debut novelist Yaa Gyasi undertook in her breathtaking debut novel Homegoing (Knopf, 2016). Perhaps her greatest impulse in creating Homegoing was articulated by one of […]